📍Flyover of Yosemite Valley

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📍Flyover of Yosemite Valley. A perfect way to visualize your visit to one of the grandest parks in the world. When you exit the Tunnel View for the first time, notice that Yosemite Valley grabs you and welcomes you in. The walls of the Valley are marked with those famous falls: Yosemite Falls. Vernal Fall. Nevada Fall. From this Flyover you can see which approach you would blaze to ascend Half Dome by trail. Outside >> Online My first trek in Yose was a five day back pack up the Mist Trail to Little Yosemite Valley (LYV). From there we reached Half Dome, Clouds Rest and out as far as Lake Merced. The #JMT or John Muir Trail has its Northern Terminus in the Yosemite Valley at Happy Isles. Please explore this wonder some day soon. The @nationalparkservice hosts many web cams and tons of maps and information: NPS.gov/yose #Yosemite #ElCapitan #HalfDome #YosemiteValley #YosemiteNationalPark #YosemiteFalls #VernalFall #NevadaFall @yosemitenps @Yosemiteeconservancy @yosemitenationalpark @thetrek.co @yosemitenation .

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South Fortuna, Mission Trails Regional Park


Mount Whitney

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♥️ Like if Mount Whitney is on your list (summit or bucket). 🗺 A 3D visualization of the trail to MtW: from Whitney Portal to the Summit. Maps tell a story, and they are designed to guide you in a proper way. Grab a topographic map and study the detail and precision that it has achieved. Next move to a Satellite image. 3D maps are the next level of visualization. There is no match for actually being in a place. Outdoors >> Online. I did this summit in 2013 on a five day back pack from Horseshoe Meadows to the summit, and then out to Whitney Portal. I’ve only walked into Whitney Portal. We started the day at Crabtree Meadows, heading east towards Mount Whitney. A stop at Guitar Lake before the ascent. Dropping packs at the Trail Junction (only 1.9 more miles to the top). By the time we had hit the summit, the weather had emptied out the place. Our party of 5 was there by ourselves. For about 30 minutes. By ourselves. I hear that the trail is a human highway. We were lucky to experience the peak with our small party. On the descent towards Whitney Portal, there was a serious precipitation deluge. Water descending in a straight down gravity path, all while we were descending down the zig zags of the 99 steps. In July, there were was ice on the Trail in the northern shadows. Darkness had set in by the time we hit the first trail camp down from the summit. People greeted us like it was a parade. It wasn’t likely that anyone would be coming out of the storm, but here was 5 trekkers with soaked packs. We had been at altitude of over 10000’ for a couple of days. Our legs and lungs were strong. I am more impressed by those that start at the Portal and summit in 24 hours. What is beautiful about this map is that you get an idea of the colors of earth. Above tree line, where the marmots live, it is a stark gray. The Riparian zones are that beautiful green and brown. Notice the difference between the darkness of the mountain shadows and the deep blues of the Alpine Lakes.

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